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The LS Primer Part 2 - Tech Article by BillaVista - Pirate4x4x.com
The LS Primer - Part 2

By Bill "BillaVista" Ansell
Photography: GM Corp., Lonny Handwork,Bill Ansell
Copyright 2009 - Bill Ansell
(click any pic to enlarge)

Introduction

Part 2 of the BillaVista LS Primer article continues our look at the latest GM small-block V8 engines - the Gen III and Gen IV motors. We pick up where we left off with Part 1, starting with a look at the so-called "truck" engines.


Turn Key Engine Supply 510 LS2 - photo: Lonny Handwork

 

Table of Contents

Part 1 Part 2
RPO’s and Generations The Gen III/IV Truck & SUV Motors
LSX, LSx, LS(X)? Gen III Truck Motors at a Glance
Vortec Gen IV Truck Motors at a Glance
Common Features of the Gen III / IV Design / Architecture Gen III Truck Motors in Detail
Gen III / IV Benefits Over Gen I/II Gen IIV Truck Motors in Detail
Gen IV advanced technologies - AFM and VVT Gen III/IV Motors by Displacement
The Car Motors GM V8 Timeline
Car Motors At a Glance Weights & Dimensions
Car Motors in Detail Car vs. Truck
  Choosing a Gen III/IV
  FAQ and Factoids
  Turn Key Engine Supply
  Conclusion
  References

The Gen III/IV Truck & SUV Motors

GM’s use of V8 motors in cars has been fairly limited since the Gen III debuted. Consumer wants have tended to smaller, more fuel-efficient everyday cars, so the big V8’s are restricted to use in just the top few performance models - like the Corvette, GTO, Camaro, and Firebird. There have only been a limited number of these types of models produced in the last decade or so, and consequently, only a few variants of the “car” V8’s – the LS motors. As a result, it’s quite easy to detail all the LS motors individually by their RPO’s, as we have done above.

Trucks are quite a different story. GM trucks and SUV’s have been using various displacement Gen III and IV V8 engines since 1998.  In the last decade or so, 4.8L, 5.3L, 6.0L, and 6.2L models have been used in everything from luxury SUV’s to big trucks. Various block and head combinations have been used to – from the earliest Gen III 6.0L Vortec LQ4 that used an iron block and iron heads, to the common iron block  / aluminum head combination in the LQ4 and LQ9, to the latest Gen IV 6.2L Vortec truck motors that have aluminum blocks and the same high-performance aluminum heads as the Corvette LS3.

Add to this the many other variables, including Flex Fuel models, AFM/DOD, VVT, ETC, etc. and the result is a dizzying array of possible RPO’s used to designate different truck motors. In fact, between 1997 and 2008, over 30 different  RPO’s have been used for Gen III & IV truck motors.

As a result, it is not practical, nor particularly useful for our purposes, to examine each of these engines by RPO listing. In some cases, the only difference between two different RPO truck motors is the flex-fuel designation.

Instead, the plan for this section is to cover the biggest, most common, and most popular truck motors by RPO, and cover the rest as a group by displacement. To keep things even more concise (and therefore readable / useful) I will not be covering the following Gen III/IV engines:

  • Cadillac NORTHSTAR 4.6L (LH2) used in 2007+ Cadillac XLR / STS / SRX / SLS (SGM) SUV’s
  • VORTEC 4.8L (Gen III LR4, Gen IV LY2) used in 2003+ Trucks, vans, and SUV’s
  • VORTEC iron block / iron head 8.1L “big block” used in 2003+ ¾-ton, 1-ton, and medium duty (Kodiak / Topkick) trucks.

The good news is this. The entire family of Gen III and IV motors were conceived, designed, engineered, and produced from the start to share common architecture so that they could be used in a variety of displacements and applications with minimum investment in design, tooling, and production. This is great news for builders, hot-rodders, and swappers. It means that, essentially, the main basic features of a 5.3L SUV engine are the same as for a 6.0L iron/aluminum truck engine which are the same as for a 6.2L all-aluminum LS motor. Obviously, there are specific differences between the motors in everything from cams & valves to cranks to pistons. And within any group of engines, whether grouped by year or application or material there are the usual year-to-year changes in things like sensor locations, etc. But, all the third and fourth generation motors share a great deal in common – which means tech and parts swapping and build-up techniques are most often completely compatible between the motors. For example, a 6.0L is generally a 6.0L, whether it be an iron block LQ4 truck motor or an all-aluminum Corvette LS2. This means you can put LS2 heads, intake, oil pan, and even cam and valvetrain in an iron 6.0L. This is not only great news for builder and tinkerers, but also for me as a writer (and you as a reader!) as it means we don’t have to go through every single truck motor by individual RPO.

Gen III Truck Motors at a Glance

Gen III – 1999-2007

RPO

Gen

Displ.

Block / Heads

Power

Applications*

Notes

LM7 / L59

III

5.3L

Iron / aluminum

295 hp / 330-335 ft-lbs

99-07 ½ & 3/4 –ton trucks, vans & SUV’s (Silverado, Sierra, Tahoe, Suburban, Yukon, Escalade, Avalanche, Express, Savana)

Early iron-block Gen III truck 5.3L V8

LM4 / L33

III

5.3L

Aluminum / aluminum

290-310 hp / 325-335 ft-lbs

03-07 Silverado & Sierra 1500,  Chevrolet SSR,  Buick Rainer, Chevrolet TrailBlazer EXT, GMC Envoy XL

Lighter, all aluminum Gen III truck 5.3L V8

LQ4

III

6.0L

Iron / aluminum

300-335 hp / 360-375 ft-lbs

99-07 ¾ & 1-ton vans; ½, ¾, & 1-ton trucks; SUV’s (Silverado, Sierra, Yukon, Suburban, Hummer H2,  Express, Savana)

First Gen III 6.0L truck engine.

Iron block.

Original version 99-00 had iron heads, 01+ had aluminum heads.

Versatile workhorse.

LQ9

III

6.0L

Iron / aluminum

345 hp / 380 ft-lbs

02-07 Cadillac Escalade, Silverado SS,  GMC Sierra Denali
07 Silverado & Sierra (classic)

H.O. version of LQ4

*Applications listed here are intended as a rough guide only.

 Gen IV Truck Motors at a Glance

Gen IV – 2005 – 2009+

RPO

Gen

Displ.

Block / Heads

Power

Applications*

Notes

L92

IV

6.2L

Aluminum / aluminum

380-403 hp / 415-417 ft-lbs

07-08  Cadillac Escalade, GMC Sierra Denali, GMC Yukon Denali, Hummer H2

Powerful, all-aluminum, truck V8 for top end SUV's.
High flow heads - basis for LS3 & LS7 heads.
With VVT.

L9H

IV

6.2L

Aluminum / aluminum

403 hp / 417 ft-lbs

09+ Silverado & Tahoe LTZ, Sierra Denali & SLT, Yukon Denali, Cadillac Escalade

Replacement for L92. Latest all-aluminum, truck V8 for top end trucks and SUV's. With VVT. Similar to L92 but equipped for E85 flex-fuel use.

LY6

IV

6.0L

Iron / aluminum

312-366 hp / 358-383 ft-lbs

07-09 Chevrolet Silverado HD / GMC Sierra HD, Chevrolet Suburban HD / GMC Yukon XL HD, Chevrolet Express / GMC Savana, Kodiac / Topkick (W Series)

Replacement for LQ4 with VVT.
Iron block work horse.
Working trucks and vans.

L76

IV

6.0L

Aluminum / aluminum

366-367 hp / 375-380 ft-lbs

07-09 Chevrolet Silverado / GMC Sierra, Chevrolet Avalanche / Chevrolet Suburban / GMC Yukon XL,

H.O. version of LY6. Replacement for LQ9. Lighter, more powerful all-aluminum 6.0L with VVT.
Street trucks and SUV’s.

LS2

IV

6.0L

Aluminum / aluminum

390-400 hp / 400-405 ft-lbs

05-09 Chevrolet TrailBlazer SS, Chevrolet SSR, Saab 9-7X Aero

Adapted from Corvette LS2 for sport trucks and SUV’s

LMF / LMG / LY5

IV

5.3L

Iron / aluminum

301-326 hp / 325-350 ft-lbs

07-09 Chevrolet Avalanche / Chevrolet Suburban / Chevrolet Tahoe / GMC Yukon / GMC Yukon XL / Chevrolet Express / GMC Savana

Little brother 5.3L version of LY6

 

LMF/LMG with E85 Flex Fuel

LC9 / LH6 / LH8

IV

5.3L

Aluminum / aluminum

300-326 hp / 320 – 350 ft-lbs

05-09 Chevrolet Silverado / GMC Sierra / Chevrolet Avalanche / Chevrolet Suburban / GMC Yukon XL / Chevrolet TrailBlazer / GMC Envoy / Buick Rainer / Isuzu Acender / Hummer H3 / Saab 9-7

Lightest, all-aluminum version of the smaller displacement 5.3: Gen IV truck motors for small-mid size trucks & SUV’s

LC9 With E85 Flex-fuel

* Applications listed here are intended as a rough guide only.

Gen III Truck Motors in Detail

I will not be going into as much detail on the truck motors as I have with the car motors. There are a few very good reasons for this.

First, there are far more Gen III/IV V8 truck motors, used in far more truck/SUV platforms, over a much wider span of years than there are car motors. This makes covering every variant, and every change year-by-year, impractical and way beyond the scope of this article.

Second, as we have discussed, the Gen III/IV motors were designed from the start to be used in many different platforms and therefore share much common architecture and many design details between them. There are differences, of course, but rather than outline every one, RPO by RPO, year by year, I have summarized the major differences between car and truck engines in the next section.

For easy reference I also provide a table grouping Gen III / IV motors together by displacement so that you can easily identify which car and truck motors are close cousins. Before I do that though, let’s take a quick look at a few of the biggest, most powerful, most desirable of the “truck” motors. Since many of these motors have had long runs and been used in many, many applications I have generally taken the specs and details from the latest / most powerful editions of each RPO.

 LQ4

Generation: III
Type: 6.0L iron block / aluminum head V8
Platform: Truck
First Year: 1999
Purpose: Original Gen III 6.0L V8 to power trucks & SUV's
Description:

Output

300-335 hp / 360-375 ft-lbs, depending on application

Displacement

5967cc (364 ci)

Compression Ratio

9.4:1

Valves

overhead valves (2 valves per cylinder)

Bore x Stroke

101.6 x 92 mm

Block

Cast iron

Cylinder Head

Cast aluminum, symmetrical ports, square 4-bolt pattern
Original version 1999-2000 had iron heads

Main bearing caps

6-bolt powder metal

Crank

Cast nodular iron, internally balanced, with undercut and rolled fillet journals

Camshaft

Billet steel with hydraulic roller tappets

Connecting Rods

Forged powder metal

Pistons

Cast aluminum

 

LQ4 - 2007 Chevy Silverado HD Classic


Photo © GM Corp.

LQ4 - 2007 Chevy Express Van


Photo © GM Corp.

Notable Features:
The Gen III LQ4, aka Vortec 6000, uses a host of the design features common to GM’s Gen III V8 family, including aluminum cylinder heads and a thermoplastic intake manifold. The deep-skirt engine block allows cross bolting of the bearing caps, limiting crank flex, stiffening the engine's structure and reducing overall vibration. The cylinder heads have replicated ports that are identical in every detail, allowing constant cylinder-to-cylinder airflow.

A steel camshaft provides excellent durability. Steel roller rockers add stiffness, allowing greater engine speed with less vibration than previous truck motors. Hydraulic roller lifters reduce friction and internal loss of power for fuel economy and wear resistance.

ELECTRONIC THROTTLE CONTROL (ETC)
ETC became standard in all 6.0L LQ4s in 2003, except those installed in the Express and Savana vans, which continued with a mechanically operated throttle body until 2007. Prior to 2003, ETC was limited to 6.0L LQ9s and LQ4s built for trucks equipped with rear-wheel electronic traction assist.  

In 2003, the LQ4 was modified for installation in the new Express and Savana vans. The LQ4 for vans is essentially the same as the variant installed in Chevrolet Silverado and GMC Sierra pickups, with two packaging adjustments:

The oil pan on the LQ4 was modified with a slight scallop in its sump to allow clearance over the van’s front suspension. In developing the new pan, engineers learned that the design further stiffened engine structure and reduced the oil pan’s natural tendency to magnify mechanical noise generated by the engine. With that information, and the desire to make common as many parts as possible, GM extended use of the Express/Savana oil pan to all Gen III Vortec V8 applications.

For the vans, the oil-fill tube and dipstick are extended.

LQ9

Generation: III
Type: 6.0L iron block / aluminum head V8
Platform: Truck
First Year: 2002
Purpose: H.O. version of the LQ4
Description:

Output

345 hp / 380 ft-lbs

Displacement

5967cc (364 ci)

Compression Ratio

10.0:1

Valves

overhead valves (2 valves per cylinder)

Bore x Stroke

101.6 x 92 mm

Block

Cast iron

Cylinder Head

Cast aluminum, symmetrical ports, square 4-bolt pattern

Main bearing caps

6-bolt powder metal

Crank

Cast nodular iron, internally balanced, with undercut and rolled fillet journals

Camshaft

Billet steel with hydraulic roller tappets

Connecting Rods

Forged powder metal

Pistons

Cast aluminum

 

LQ9 - 2005


Photo © GM Corp.

LQ9 - 2007 Chevy Silverado Classic - note "Vortec MAX" badging


Photo © GM Corp.

Notable Features:
The 6.0L LQ9 is a more powerful evolution of the LQ4, developed for Cadillac's luxury sport utility vehicles. It features increased power output achieved primarily through the use of LQ9-specific: flat-top pistons, rods, crank, and beefier pushrods that increase the compression ratio from 9.4:1 (for the LQ4) to 10.0:1.  The block and heads are common with the LQ4.
Originally referred to as the “Vortec H.O. 6000”, in 2006 the LQ9 was renamed the “Vortec MAX” to underscore its being the most powerful light duty V8 in GM’s truck line at that time. The 2006+ engine “vanity” cover displays new “Vortec MAX” badging.

Applications:

All 345 hp / 380 ft-lbs

2002-2004 Cadillac Escalade
2002-2006 Cadillac Escalade EXT
2005-2006 Cadillac Escalade AWD
2005 Cadillac Escalade ESD
2006 Cadillac Escalade (2WD) / Cadillac Escalade ESV
2004-2006 Chevrolet Silverado SS
2005-2006 GMC Sierra Denali
2006 Chevrolet Silverado ( w/ Vortec Max Performance Package )
2007 Chevrolet Silverado ( Classic ) / Chevrolet Silverado SS (Classic) / GMC Sierra ( Classic )

Gen IV Truck Motors in Detail

L92

Generation: IV
Type: 6.2L All Aluminum V8
Platform: Truck
First Year:  2007
Purpose: 6.2L for high-end SUV’s
Description:

Output

380-403 hp / 415-417 ft-lbs, depending on application

Displacement

6162cc (376 ci)

Compression Ratio

10.5:1

Valves

2.165 in (55.0 mm) hollow stem intake / sodium-filled 1.59 in (40 mm)  exhaust

Bore x Stroke

103.25 x 92mm

Block

Deep skirt cast aluminum alloy, with pressed-in iron cylinder liners.

Cylinder Head

Cast aluminum, symmetrical ports, square 4-bolt pattern

Main bearing caps

Powder metal

Crank

Cast nodular iron, internally balanced, with undercut and rolled fillet journals

Camshaft

Gun-drilled billet steel with hydraulic roller tappets

Connecting Rods

Forged powder metal

Pistons

Flat-top, cast hypereutectic aluminum/silicon alloy

 

L92 - 2008 Hummer H2


Photo © GM Corp.

L92 - 2007 Cadillac Escalade


Photo © GM Corp.

L92 - 2008 Hummer H2


David Kimble Illustration © GM Corp.

L92 Engine Block

 


Photo © GM Corp.

Notable Features:

The L92 is basically the truck version of the LS3, although it preceded the LS3 by a year. More accurately, the LS3 was developed from the L92, particularly the amazing high-flow cylinder heads that first appeared on the L92.

The L92 cylinder heads are based on those developed for the high-performance LS2 and LS6 car V8s. However the L92 heads improve considerably on both the LS6 and LS2 heads. The L92 heads have offset rockers, like those in the LS7. They also have larger valves than other Vortec V8 heads and increase airflow in and out of the engine for higher horsepower.  A special high-lift cam, with 12.7 mm. maximum lift (compared to 11.6 mm in most other Vortec V8s) takes full advantage of the improved flow characteristics.  In conjunction with unique pistons, the high-flow heads give the L92 a 10.5:1 compression ratio. They are the single biggest contributor to the L92’s increased horsepower compared to other Vortec V8s.

The L92 is very similar to the LS3 but with truck intake and oil pan, truck/SUV ECM programming, and its use of VVT.

The L92 also utilizes many high-tech features previously discussed for the LS3, including:

  • Returnless Fuel Injection with Stainless Steel Fuel Rail
  • Advanced Electronic Throttle Control
  • E38 Engine Control Module
  • Enhanced Noise, Vibration and Harshness Control
  • 58X Ignition System
  • Advanced Ignition Coils

 Applications and Power:

2007-2008 GMC Yukon Denali / GMC Yukon XL Denali - 380hp / 417lb-ft
2007-2008 GMC Sierra Denali / Cadillac Escalade / Cadillac Escalade ESV / Cadillac Escalade EXT - 403hp / 417lb-ft
2008 Hummer H2 / Hummer H2 SUT - 393hp / 415lb-ft

LY6

Generation: IV
Type: 6.0L iron block V8
Platform: Truck
First Year:  2007
Purpose: 6.0L for trucks and SUV’s
Description:

Output

312-366 hp / 358-383 ft-lbs, depending on application

Displacement

5967cc (364 ci)

Compression Ratio

9.6:1

Valves

Overhead valves (2 valves per cylinder)

Bore x Stroke

101.6 x 92mm

Block

Deep skirt cast iron.

Cylinder Head

Cast aluminum, symmetrical ports, square 4-bolt pattern

Main bearing caps

Powder metal

Crank

Cast nodular iron, internally balanced, with undercut and rolled fillet journals

Camshaft

Gun-drilled billet steel with hydraulic roller tappets

Connecting Rods

Powder metal

Pistons

Cast aluminum

 

LY6 - 2007 Chevy Silverado HD


Photo © GM Corp.

LY6 - 2008 Chevy Express Van


Photo © GM Corp.

Notable Features:

The LY6 is the iron block / aluminum head Gen IV 6.0L workhorse truck engine, replacement for the Gen III LQ4. The LY6 features VVT.

Like the L92, the LY6 features many advanced Gen IV features including:

  • Gen IV Engine Block
  • High Flow Cylinder Heads
  • VVT
  • Returnless Fuel Injection with Stainless Steel Fuel Rail
  • Advanced Electronic Throttle Control
  • E38 Engine Control Module
  • Enhanced Noise, Vibration and Harshness Control
  • 58X Ignition System
  • Advanced Ignition Coils

 L76

Generation: IV
Type: 6.0L All Aluminum V8
Platform: Truck
First Year:  2007
Purpose: H.O. version of LY6. Lighter, more powerful all-aluminum 6.0L for trucks and SUV’s
Description:

Output

366-367 hp / 375-380 ft-lbs, depending on application

Displacement

5967cc (364 ci)

Compression Ratio

9.6:1

Valves

Overhead valves (2 valves per cylinder)

Bore x Stroke

101.6 x 92mm

Block

Deep skirt cast aluminum alloy.

Cylinder Head

Cast aluminum, symmetrical ports, square 4-bolt pattern

Main bearing caps

Powder metal

Crank

Cast nodular iron, internally balanced, with undercut and rolled fillet journals

Camshaft

Gun-drilled billet steel with hydraulic roller tappets

Connecting Rods

Powder metal

Pistons

Cast aluminum

 


Photo © GM Corp.

L76 - 2008 Chevy Silverado

 

Notable Features:

The L76 is the all-aluminum Gen IV 6.0L, lightweight, H.O. version of the LY6 and is the replacement for the Gen III LQ9 for use in trucks and SUV’s. The L76 features AFM, VVT, and ETC.

Like the L92 and LY6, the L76 features many advanced Gen IV features including:

  • Gen IV Engine Block
  • High Flow Cylinder Heads
  • VVT
  • Returnless Fuel Injection with Stainless Steel Fuel Rail
  • Advanced Electronic Throttle Control
  • E38 Engine Control Module
  • Enhanced Noise, Vibration and Harshness Control
  • 58X Ignition System
  • Advanced Ignition Coils

Unlike the L92 and LY6, the L76 also uses AFM, described above in the section on Gen IV technologies.

L9H

Generation: IV
Type: 6.2L All Aluminum V8
Platform: Truck
First Year:  2009
Purpose: Latest most powerful V8 for trucks and SUV’s
Description:

Output

393-403 hp / 415-417 ft-lbs, depending on application

Displacement

6162cc (376 ci)

Compression Ratio

10.5:1

Valves

Overhead valves (2 valves per cylinder)

Bore x Stroke

103.25 x 92mm

Block

Deep skirt cast aluminum alloy.

Cylinder Head

Cast aluminum, symmetrical ports, square 4-bolt pattern

Main bearing caps

Powder metal

Crank

Cast nodular iron, internally balanced, with undercut and rolled fillet journals

Camshaft

Gun-drilled billet steel with hydraulic roller tappets

Connecting Rods

Powder metal

Pistons

Cast aluminum

 


Photo © GM Corp.

L9H - 2009 GMC Sierra Denali.

Notable Features:

The L9H is the latest, most powerful all-aluminum Gen IV Vortec (truck) V8 from GM for select 2009 trucks and SUV’s. It replaces the L92 as the top-of-the line GM truck engine. Unlike the L92 it is equipped for E85 flex-fuel use. It has VVT.

Like the L92, LY6, and L76 the L9H features many advanced Gen IV features including:

  • Gen IV Engine Block
  • High Flow Cylinder Heads
  • VVT
  • Returnless Fuel Injection with Stainless Steel Fuel Rail
  • Advanced Electronic Throttle Control
  • E38 Engine Control Module
  • Enhanced Noise, Vibration and Harshness Control
  • 58X Ignition System
  • Advanced Ignition Coils

 It has the following L9H specific features:

  • High-Flow Cylinder Heads with revised E85-compatible valve seats
  • “New” L9H camshaft profile with VVT
  • Low modulus A/C compressor belt

 Like other Gen IV Vortec V8’s, the L9H is equipped with high-flow cylinder heads based on those developed for the high-performance LS2 and LS6 car V8s. These heads have offset rockers, like those in the LS7. They also have larger valves than other Vortec V8 heads, and increase airflow in and out of the engine for higher horsepower.  The L9H cylinder heads feature special valve seat inserts to accommodate the engine’s use of for E85 fuel.  A special high-lift cam, with 12.7 mm. maximum lift, was further refined to take full advantage of the VVT, improved flow characteristics and to optimize idle quality.  In conjunction with unique pistons, the high-flow heads give the L9H a 10.5:1 compression ratio.

On the L9H a new low modulus A/C compressor belt was employed.  This design eliminates the need for a separate belt tensioner, further simplifying the design and reducing mass. 

Applications:

2009 Chevrolet Tahoe LTZ / Chevrolet Silverado LTZ
2009 GMC Yukon Denali / GMC Yukon XL Denali / GMC Sierra Denali / GMC Sierra SLT
2009 Cadillac Escalade / Cadillac Escalade ESV / Cadillac Escalade EXT
2009 HUMMER H2 / HUMMER H2 SUT

 Gen III/IV Motors by Displacement

Displ.

RPO

Gen

Platform

Block

Years

Power

Replaces

Notes

7.0L

LS7

IV

Car

Aluminum

2006-2008

470 hp / 505 lb-ft

LS6

Dry Sump

6.2L

LS9

IV

Car

Aluminum

2009+

638 hp / 604 lb-ft

LS7

Supercharged

 

LSA

IV

Car

Aluminum

2009+

556 hp / 551 lb-ft

 

Supercharged

 

LS3

IV

Car

Aluminum

2008+

430 hp / 424 lb-ft

LS2

 

 

L9H

IV

Truck

Aluminum

2009+

403 hp / 417 ft-lbs

L92

VVT

 

L92

IV

Truck

Aluminum

2007-2008

403 hp / 417 ft-lbs

LQ9

VVT

6.0L

L76

IV

Car

Aluminum

2008+

361 hp / 385 lb-ft

 

X between truck L76 and LS3

 

LS2

IV

Car & Truck

Aluminum

2005-2009+

400 hp / 405 lb-ft

LS1

Car 05-07 / Truck 05-09

 

L76

IV

Truck

Aluminum

2007-2009+

367 hp / 380 ft-lbs

 

H.O. version of LY6 / VVT

 

LY6

IV

Truck

Iron

2007-2009+

366 hp / 383 ft-lbs

LQ4

VVT

 

LQ9

III

Truck

Iron

2002-2007

345 hp / 380 ft-lbs

 

H.O. version of LQ4

 

LQ4

III

Truck

Iron

1999-2007

335 hp / 375 ft-lbs

Gen I Vortec

First Gen III 6.0L

5.7L

LS6

III

Car

Aluminum

2001-2005

405 hp / 400 lb-ft

 

H.O. version of LS1

 

LS1

III

Car

Aluminum

1997-2004

350 hp / 375 lb-ft

Gen II LT2

First Gen III V8

5.3L

LS4

IV

Car

Aluminum

2005-2009+

303 hp / 323 lb-ft

 

Transverse for FWD cars

 

LC9 / LH6 / LH8

IV

Truck

Aluminum

2005-2009+

326 hp / 350 ft-lbs

LM4 / L33

Little brother of L76

 

LMF / LMG / LY5

IV

Truck

Iron

2007-2009+

326 hp / 350 ft-lbs

LM7 / L59

Little brother of LY6

 

LM4 / L33

III

Truck

Aluminum

2003-2007

310 hp / 335 ft-lbs

 

First all-aluminum 5.3

 

LM7 / L59

III

Truck

Iron

1999-2007

295 hp / 335 ft-lbs

 

Little brother of LQ4

GM V8 Timeline

1955

Gen I The small block engine was first introduced by former Chief Engineer/Chevrolet General Manager Ed Cole. This early version was called the “Turbo-Fire V8,” and ranged from 162 to 180 horsepower.

1982

Gen I - Crossfire Injection System was introduced that used twin above-the-throttle-body Electronic Fuel Injectors and a specially designed manifold.

1985

Gen I L98 5.7L with Tuned Port Fuel Injection (TPI) for Corvette

1986

Gen I One-piece rear main seal

1987

Gen I GM Throttle Body Injection (TBI)

1990

LT5 All-aluminum 5.7 L 32-valve DOHC heads for Corvette ZR-1.

1992

LT1  Gen II 5.7L

1996

LT4 Gen II 5.7L

1997

LS1 Gen III 5.7L all-aluminum for C5 Corvette

1999

LM7 / L59 Gen III iron/aluminum 5.3L for trucks and SUV's

LQ4 Gen III iron/aluminum 6.0L for trucks and SUV's

2001

LS6 Gen III all-aluminum 5.7L for Corvette Z06

2002

LQ9 Gen III iron/aluminum 6.0L for trucks and SUV's

2003

LM4 / L33 Gen III all-aluminum 5.3L for trucks and SUV's

2005

LS2 Gen IV all-aluminum 6.0L for Corvette, SSR, & GTO

LS4 Gen IV all-aluminum 4.8L transverse V8 for FWD cars

LC9 / LH6 / LH8 Gen III all-aluminum 5.3L for trucks and SUV's

2006

LS7 Gen IV all-aluminum 7.0L for Corvette Z06

2007

L92 Gen IV all-aluminum 6.2L for SUV's

LY6 Gen IV iron/aluminum 6.0L for trucks and SUV's

L76 Gen IV all-aluminum 6.0L for trucks and SUV's

LMF / LMG / LY5 Gen IV iron/aluminum 5.3L for trucks and SUV's

2008

LS3 Gen IV all-aluminum 6.2L for Corvette

LS9 Gen IV Supercharged all-aluminum 6.2L for Corvette ZR1

L76 Gen IV all-aluminum 6.0L for Pontiac GT G8

2009

LSA Gen IV Supercharged all-aluminum 6.2L for Cadillac CTS-V

L9H Gen IV all-aluminum 6.2L for SUV's

Weights & Dimensions

LS1 bare intake – 8lbs
Complete LS1 – 430lbs
Complete iron block 6.0 – 518lbs
Complete Gen I/II – 531lbs
LS1 bare aluminum block – 103 lbs

Motor Measurements

Gen 1 Chevy small block V8 circa 1979 of unknown origin and with home-brew TBI conversion:

Width:

– 18.25" – to the outside of the heads

– 23.5" – to the outside of the manifolds

Length:

– 21.5" – length of block
– 25" – from front of harmonic balancer to rear edge of block
– 29.25" – from front of water pump pulley to rear edge of block

Height:

– 21.5" – from bottom of oil pan to top of valve covers
– 26.5" – from bottom of oil pan to top of throttle body

Oil Pan – 7.5” deep

Turn Key Engine Supply LS2:

Width:

– 20 " – to the outside of the heads

– 23" – from the coolant inlet to the outside of the power steering pump pulley

– 25" - to the outside of the coil covers

– 30" - to the outside of the Doug Thorly block hugger headers

Length:

– 20.5" – length of block
– 25-1/4" – from front of harmonic balancer to rear edge of block
– 29" – from front of water pump pully to rear edge of block

Height:

– 25" – from bottom of oil pan to top of intake

Oil Pan – 5.5” deep (Camaro LS1 oil pan)

 

Car vs. Truck

As we’ve discussed, the Gen III/IV architecture is broadly common across all platforms. Obviously, motors of different displacement use different blocks and bottom ends (cranks, rods, pistons, etc.).  Of course, even very similar motors of the same displacement have differences between them when used in different platforms. The differences can be as large as different heads, valves, cams, and ECM programming or as minor as the style of air intake and vanity covers.

With that said, motors of the same displacement are quite similar whether they are “car” or “truck” motors, but there are some common differences that are worth being aware of:

Block material
All Gen III/IV car motors are aluminum block. Truck motors can be iron- or aluminum-block. The aluminum blocks use cast-in-place or pressed-in iron cylinder liners. The iron blocks need no liners. As a result, aluminum motors are generally very limited in the amount of over-bore they can tolerate if being rebuilt. The iron blocks, as a rule, are better candidates for over-bore. For example, the 5.3L iron-block truck motors can easily be bored from to in order to create an iron-block 5.7L motor.

The iron block motors also have exceptionally strong blocks because the block design was engineered to be strong enough in aluminum, so the extra strength of cast iron over aluminum makes the iron block very strong. This makes the iron-block motors great candidates for building supercharged or nitrous-fed animals.

Weight
Depending on the specific motor in question, an iron-block truck motor is about 90 lbs heavier than its aluminum-block car motor cousin of the same displacement; due mostly to the extra weight of the iron block over the aluminum block.

Height – intake and oil pan
One of the biggest drawbacks to stuffing a stock truck motor in a buggy is the extra height of the truck motor, compared to the car motor. The truck intake is 3.1” taller than the car intake, and the truck oil pan is about 3” deeper than the car pan (depending on the exact car in question). This makes the overall truck engine 6” or so taller than a similar car motor, which can be significant when packaging a motor in an offroad buggy where both ground/suspension clearance under the pan and hood clearance/visibility over the intake are both very important. Some folks choose to swap readily available used car take-off intakes and oil pans onto the truck motors to solve the height issue. The oil pan swap is a simple direct bolt-on, the intake swap is more complicated and will likely include having to deal with different front accessories, fuel rails, etc.

Price
Whether a used motor, crate motor, or all-out custom motor from a pro builder like Turn Key Engine Supply  - an all-aluminum motor almost always commands a higher price than the same size “truck” motor with an iron block. This is due not only to the higher cost of aluminum over cast iron, but it’s also a supply and demand issue – the all-aluminum car motors are more highly sought and produced in far smaller quantities than the truck motors. The increased production of all-aluminum truck motors in recent years is good news here – as the truck and SUV V8 motors are produced in much huger numbers than the car motors. This not only means that more all-aluminum motors will eventually be available in junkyards, but it also skews the supply & demand equation slightly more in favour of the buggy builder.

AFM / VVT
Gen IV all-aluminum motors are available in both car and truck versions. The car motors are used in top-of-the-line sports and luxury/performance cars, and as such do not use features like AFM and VVT. Even the L76, which is basically a truck motor, deletes VVT for use in the Pontiac GT G8. In contrast, many of the later Gen IV all-aluminum truck motors are now using VVT and/or AFM in truck and SUV applications.  This may or may not be an issue of concern to the builder, depending on what their plan is for stock or aftermarket ECM control and programming.

Miscellaneous
Cams, pistons, heads, valves, ECM programming, manual or ETC throttle, along with other minor and cosmetic items from vanity covers to oil dipstick locations and lengths will all be potentially different between truck and car motors, even of the same displacement.

Power & Truck Intake
If you browse the specifics of the motors described in detail above, you will see that specific engines (i.e. a combination of a given RPO and specific application make/model/year) have specific rated power outputs. Sometimes the difference between very similar engines (e.g. LS1 in Camaro =305hp vs LS1 in Corvette = 350hp) can be large, and sometimes very small (e.g. LS2 in Corvette = 400hp vs. LS2 in SSR = 395 hp). Sometimes the difference is explained by internal components (different pistons, cams, valves, heads, etc.) and sometimes by smaller external components like ECM programming or exhaust manifolds.

One often-claimed enduring myth related to the difference between truck and car motors relates back to the taller truck intake. It is often claimed that the taller truck intake “makes better low-end torque” than the equivalent car intake. This is not correct. First, the reason the truck intake is so much taller than the car intake is not because it was designed specifically to make “better” low-end torque than a car – it is taller because it needs to be so the throttle body can clear the much larger radiator / fan used in the trucks and SUV’s. That is not to say that the truck engines with tall truck intakes don’t make excellent power – down low and up high – they do!  But I think it is incorrect to suggest that in identical motors, one equipped with a truck intake and one with a car intake, the truck engine would make “better” low-end torque. To prove my assertion, I offer the following evidence:

The LS2 and L76 were used in both cars and trucks in the same year, as shown below:


Photo © GM Corp.

LS2 - 2005 Corvette (car).


Photo © GM Corp.

LS2 - 2005 GTO (car).


Photo © GM Corp.

LS2 - 2005 Chevy SSR (truck).

Note the intakes, accessory packages, and oil pans are different between the cars and trucks. The same is true for the L76 below:


Photo © GM Corp.

L76 - 2008 Pontiac GT G8 (car).


Photo © GM Corp.

L76 - 2008 Chevy Silverado (truck).

So, we have the closest examples we're likely to find to identical motors with different intakes - car and truck.

If the myth were true, we should expect to find noticeably different HP/ torque curves on the respective dyno graphs.

However, when we examine the graphs for these exact engines, below, we find no such differences. There are some minor differences between the exact curves, attributable to any number of small differences like ECM and exhaust, but certainly nothing that would allow the claim "truck intakes make better low-end torque than car intakes."

Sorry - it just aint so!


© GM Corp.

LS2 - 2005 Corvette (car).


© GM Corp.

LS2 - 2005 GTO (car).


© GM Corp.

LS2 - 2005 Chevy SSR (truck).

 


Photo © GM Corp.

L76 - 2008 Pontiac GT G8 (car).


Photo © GM Corp.

L76 - 2008 Chevy Silverado (truck).

Careful examination of the stock performance curves reveals that there are essentially very little difference in the low end torque produced, certainly not enough to justify ever choosing a truck engine over a car motor for this mythical benefit. Minor differences are much more likely to be attributable to the host of small differences – ECM programming and such, than to the height of the intake.

Bottom line, both motors are so well engineered, so well optimized, and so well controlled by the ECM that they both make excellent power across the entire RPM range. Gone are the days of having to choose between low-end torque or high hp performance at the top end. In summary, a desire for low-end torque probably shouldn’t be used as a basis for choosing a truck motor over a car motor. Heck – my Turn Key Engine Supply built “car” LS2 never makes less than 400 ft-lbs of torque throughout its entire range!!

Accessories
Many different front accessory packages have been used on Gen III and IV motors. In general, cars are different from trucks and not completely interchangeable. However, once again the basic architecture commonality of Gen III/IV engines means that without too much work, just about any combination of accessories, accessory mounting location, and drive belt routing is possible. In general, between trucks and cars, there are differences in the harmonic dampers, water pumps and idler(s), as well as power-steering pump and alternator models and locations. If swapping accessories or swapping intakes between cars and trucks, the most challenging issue is the different water pumps as the water pump outlets on the truck accessories interfere with the throttle body on the car intakes. In addition, the harmonic dampers have different offsets from the face of the block, intake systems have different MAF diameters, etc. Some choose to install a car intake on a truck motor backwards, so that the throttle body is at the back of the car. This way you don’t have to change the truck’s front accessories to fit the car intake, but it does mean you will have to deal with the air filter / intake inside the cab, which can be annoyingly loud. The best way to get an idea of accessory layout is to browse the pictures of the different car and truck motors in this article. Of course, companies like Turn Key can either build you a motor with any combination / layout of accessories you desire, or sell you the parts you need to convert and/or swap around whatever you need on the front of any Gen III/IV motor.  Common issues include upper front suspension link clearance from low-mounted accessories like the alternator location in many LS motors.
 
Van motors
Van and truck motors are very similar, but the van motors do have a couple of specific differences due to the more confined space under the hood of a van.  Van motors lack the plastic "beauty" covers and have extended dipsticks and oil-filler tubes. Van motors were also available with manual throttles after the truck motors had all moved to ETC. Below are identical motors - one from a truck and one from a van.

LQ4 - 2007 Chevy Silverado HD Classic


Photo © GM Corp.

LQ4 - 2007 Chevy Express Van


Photo © GM Corp.

Choosing a Gen III/IV

So, now that you know everything about Gen III/IV motors, the meat of the question is: “how do you choose one?”, or perhaps, “How do I evaluate whether this motor I found a good deal on will be ok for my needs?”

In the case of the former, the ultimate answer would be call a company like Turn Key to custom build you any thing your heart desires. Very shortly I will be offering an exclusive in-depth look at this dream option by publishing an unprecedented, detailed look at the 525hp LS2 recently built for me by Turn Key Engine Supply – from the engine build to the dyno sheet to the details of every accessory and part included in the package.

In the meantime, I offer you this:

Personally, I would always choose an all-aluminum  “car” motor over any other option, if I could, for the following reasons:

  1. Available in displacements from 5.7L to 7.0L
  2. Lighter (90 lbs) and more compact (6”+ shorter) than a truck motor
  3. Easier to package - car oil pan provides better ground/suspension clearance, car intake provides lower hood for better visibility
  4. Plenty of power across the entire RPM range – gone are the days when car motors are no good for use in trucks – these motors are just that superior to earlier engines
  5. In general, the car ”LS” motors have better aftermarket support, including performance parts and aftermarket harnesses and ECM programming.
  6. No AFM/DOD or VVT to deal with
  7. Who doesn’t want a supercharged engine with titanium bits inside!

That said, truck motors do have some advantages of their own:

  1. Lower cost, especially for iron block Gen III motors
  2. Produced in vast numbers – easier to find used
  3. Truck accessories and parts are often cheaper than their car counterparts
  4. If you plan to rebuild or overbore, an iron block is the better (or at least cheaper and easier) choice
  5. Iron blocks are super-strong and make a good basis for supercharging or adding Nitrous (not that you can’t supercharge or juice a car LS motor)

FAQ and Factoids

A bunch of interesting (maybe) stuff I couldn’t be bothered to fit anywhere else.

ETC summary

ETC, also known as "Drive by Wire" or “Throttle by Wire” requires a special pedal, harness and control module. There is no throttle cable, or direct connection between the throttle pedal and the throttle plate in the throttle body. Instead, the pedal sends electronic signals to the ECM. The ECM controls a Throttle Actuator Control (TAC) module which then operates the electric motor that opens and closes the throttle. ETC engines are easy to spot because of the electric motor assembly clearly visible on the side of the throttle body.

Some applications Electronic Throttle Control (ETC) was used on include:

  1. all 97+ Corvettes
  2. all 03+ LQ4’s except those installed in the Express and Savana vans
  3. 07+ Express and Savana vans
  4. All LQ9s
  5. LQ4s prior to 03 in trucks equipped with rear-wheel electronic traction assist.
  6. All Gen IV motors

ETC was originally conceived and designed to enable better traction control to make the 400hp Corvette drivable by ordinary people.

“Advanced” ETC (on all ETC motors from the 2006 LS2 and up) deletes the need for a separate TAC and uses only the E38 and later ECM for operation and control.

Depths of Different Oil Pans

LS7 – dry sump - 4.5”

Bat-wing Vette – 4.75” (C5 corvette (with LS1)

Corvette – 5” (non bat-wing)

Camaro/Firebird – 5.5”

GTO – front sump – 6”

Cadillac CTS-V – 6.75”

Hummer H3 5.3L – 7.5”

Truck 8.25”

An F-body (Camaro/Firebird) LS1 oil pan makes the bottom of the oil pan level with the bottom of a TH400 transmission pan. When swapping an oil pan you need the pan, the dipstick and tube, the pickup tube, and the gasket.

Miscellaneous

All the fasteners used on Gen III/IV motors are metric!

Assuming you are buying from a trustworthy source, you can run the VIN to see what motor you're dealing with. (Read 8th position of the VIN: "N" = LQ9 "U" = LQ4) A scan tool can pull it from the PCM if you don't have access to the VIN plate or the registration/title.

Stock Gen III/IV motors come stock with specific "self protection" programming included in the ECM code. One example is a program called "torque management". The idea is, under certain circumstances, the ECM automatically reduces engine power produced to protect the drivetrain. It makes sense for an ordinary vehicle (especially for GM while said vehicle is under warranty) but isn't much use to enthusiasts. It's said the aftermarket computer re=programming alone can reliably net 10% gains in gross power - 30-40hp!

In vehicles that use the same RPO engine, but have different HP/TQ ratings, it is most often air intake assembly, exhaust manifolds and exhaust, and different programming in the ECM that accounts for the differences. Rumour has it that sometimes GM also intentionally underrates certain engines in certain model vehicles to keep happy the owners of the higher-end vehicles that use the same engine. For example, a Cadillac Escalade and GMC Denali may use the same motor, but the Caddy will always be rated higher as it commands a higher price. This may just be wishful thinking urban legend though.

The engine mount locations are about 4 inches more to the rear on Gen III/IV blocks compared to Gen I. If you need to bolt a Gen III/IV motor in where a Gen I SBC once was, companies such as Turn Key Engine Supply and Advance Adapters sell conversion plates that bolt to the four holes in the Gen III/IV block and also provide the traditional three-bolt mounting pattern for Gen I SBC motor mounts.

GM publishes a 5.7L LS1 swap guide (PN 88959384) that is a good source for swapping Gen III engines.

Cam swapping in Gen III/IV motors is easier than in previous motors. With earlier small-block engines, you have to yank the intake manifold and then remove the lifters before the cam will come out. The Gen III/IV engines employ a plastic roller-lifter retainer that captures the lifters so you don't have to remove the intake. Just pull the rockers off to unload the lifters, spin the engine around two revolutions, and you're ready to go.

The “cathedral style” intake ports on early Gen III motors came about as a result of the lack of room between the head bolts and the in-line pushrods.

LQ4/LQ9 truck engine aluminum heads have the same ports as the LS6 but slightly larger combustion chambers for the truck compression ratio (LQ4/LQ9 = 72cc, LS6 = 64cc).

The 4.8 & 5.3 litre cast iron truck blocks (Gen III and IV) can easily be bored to 5.7L size. The 4.8 requires a longer-stroke crank to achieve this displacement, but the 5.3 can become a 5.7L with the stock crank. The cast-iron 6.0L engines already have a 4.000” bore which is pretty much the max so they aren’t good candidates for an overbore to gain displacement.

On most Gen III/IV aluminum blocks the the piston bores are actually thin centrifugally cast-in-place cast iron liner with a serrated outside diameter that bites into the aluminum block. These thin cast iron liners are the reason there is a strict (and small) limit on how much an aluminum block can be honed / bored. Gm recommends only 0.004” (little more than a surface honing) on 97-98 LS1 blocks, and only 0.010” on 99+ blocks. This isn’t a huge deal though as fortunately the aluminum Gen III/IV motors are produced with stock displacements from 4.8 to 7.0 litres and have a designed service life of 400,000 kms.

Rotation (of crankshaft), viewed from front: clockwise.

Head bolts are non-reusable “stretch to torque” style.

LS1 exhaust ports are oval,LS6 ports are “D” shaped.

The stock nodular cast iron crank has consistently shown it can handle 500+ hp, as have the stock cast eutectic aluminum pistons. Much over 500 and both should probably be replaced with stronger forged pieces.

The cast-iron block can easily handle 800hp.

Gen III/IB cranking fuel pressure: 53 – 63 psi.

Truck Strokes:
4.8L – 3.267” (83mm)
5.3L – 3.662” (92mm)
6.0L – 3.662” (92mm)

The LS6 intake (dropped floor, more volume, better flow, no EGR compared to LS1) became the standard LS1 intake as well in 2001.

The OD of the Gen III cam bores was changed for model year '04, so the later engines require a different set of cam bearings, even though the cam and everything else stayed the same.

All the head bolts have blind holes, so rebuilders need to make sure there's no debris or oil in them before torquing the head bolts down, because the hydraulic pressure will split the block wide open if there's anything left in the hole.

The 4.8L piston is a flat top, but the 5.3L is dished because they both use the same head, so the 5.3L with the longer stroke would have had too much compression with a flat top piston.

The LS1 pistons are made of a good, standard aluminum alloy that was more than adequate for a regular motor, but the pistons for the LS6 pistons were made of a premium alloy that had more copper and nickel in it so they were stronger and they didn't expand quite as much when they were hot. The additional strength was important in a performance motor, but the lower expansion rate was more important because it allowed GM to run tighter bore clearances which reduced noise and lowered oil consumption.

The 6.0L pistons were all flat tops, but the ones used for the 6.0L LQ9 had a moly coating on the skirts and a thermal barrier on the top.

All of the Gen III pistons have had a moly coating on the skirts since 2003.

Cams
The Gen III/IV cams are all steel billets that are gun-drilled (17mm hole) and designed for hydraulic roller tappets (lifters). The Gen III/IV cams are considerably larger in diameter and a lot stronger than Gen I/II cams so the whole valve train is more stable as a result.

The cam used in the '02-'04 LS6 had a smaller base circle so the valves were 0.6 mm longer to compensate for the difference. That means this cam can't be interchanged with any other cam unless all the matching components are used, too.

Cylinder Heads

'97-'98 LS1 - The original LS1 heads were 10215339 or 12558806 castings that had 66.7cc chambers and nine bolts around the perimeter to hold the rocker covers on.

'99-'04 LS1 - The LS1 switched to centre-bolt rocker covers in '99, so these engines came with a new head. These heads have 66.7cc chambers, too.

'01-'04 LS6 - The LS6 performance engines had the 12564243 castings that flowed more air due to better intake ports and the "D" shaped exhaust ports. The chamber was a little smaller (61.15cc) so the engine had a slightly higher compression ratio, too.

The cast iron head on the '99-'01 truck 6.0L engines was a 12561873 casting.

All of the '01- '04 6.0L engines had an aluminum head with a 12562317 or 12572035 casting number. These heads were used on all the 6.0L motors including the standard LQ4 and the LQ9 performance motor. They're easy to recognize because they have the same "D" shaped exhaust ports that were found on the LS6 heads.

Valves
Gen III exhaust valves are all the same size (1.55”), but the intakes came in two different sizes. The 4.8L and 5.3L engines used 1.890” intake valves, while the 6.0L and 5.7L engines used 2.00” intake valves.

The LS6 used lightweight valves with hollow stems starting in '02. The hollow intakes saved some weight, but the hollow exhausts were filled with sodium so they ran cooler. Both of these valves are 0.6 mm longer than the others because the cam for the '02 LS6 had a smaller base circle.

Gen III/IV pushrods are longer than the ones for the Gen I/II motors and they have thicker walls.

The aluminum blocks are very sensitive to main bearing clearances and cam bearing clearance because they will increase when the engine gets hot.

GM changed the length of some of the head bolts in 2004. The '99-'03 engines had 16 long ones, (6.50” overall length) and four short ones, (4.40” overall length) along with 10 small 8.0 mm bolts. In '04, GM started using all short bolts (4.40”) to avoid the stripped threads that were caused when people put the short ones in the deep holes and tried to torque them down.

All of the 5.3L engines got the LS1-style heads with the "D"-shaped exhaust ports in 2004. The dished pistons were replaced by flat-tops, too.

Turn Key Engine Supply

Next month I'm going to take you on a detailed guided tour of one of the many fantastic Gen III/IV turnkey engine packages available from industry leaders Turn Key Engine Supply of Oceanside, California.

Turn Key Engine Supply specialize in providing the most complete crate engine packages in the industry. When a customer receives a Turn Key Engine package, the idea is to place the engine in the car, install gas lines, water lines, and simply hook up 5 wires.

They specialize in custom Gen III/IV V8 crate engines with available power ranging from 350-750 horsepower - all on pump gas. Turn Key has spent countless hours on the Dyno perfecting their calibrations for the Delphi MEFI 4 engine management system to offer a variety of custom, fine-tuned engine packages.

Turn Key engines have raced in the Baja 1000, Australian Outback Challenge, and the Dakar Rally 2006.

Do they live up to the hype? Do they really include everything you need? Stay tuned and find out next month!

Conclusion

The third and fourth generation GM small block V8 engines are a technological tour-de-force and breathtaking example of simple, elegant engineering. They have to rank as one of the greatest “told-you-so” stories of all time as they resoundingly proved the naysayers wrong and showed that pushrod engines are anything but washed-up old-school.

In my opinion they also have to rank as some of the very finest motors ever conceived, engineered and built. Smaller, lighter, making more horsepower and torque per cubic inch, creating fewer emissions, and more fuel efficient than the legendary Chevy small-blocks they replaced they are a resounding success. The Gen III/IV engines profit from excellent simplicity and elegant engineering built into the design. They produce more power more efficiently than multi-cam engines that cost significantly more to build. They represent a significant and distinguished accomplishment in engineering.

References:

Books:

How to Build High-Performance Chevy LS1/LS6 V-8s by Will Handzel

Chevy LS1/LS6 Performance: High Performance Modifications for Street and Racing by Chris Endres

How to Rebuild GM LS-Series Engines by Chris Werner

Websites:

GM Media Online:

Turn Key Engine Supply

LS1Tech.com forums

Pirate4x4.com LS(x) thread

Peterson's 4Wheel & Offroad 6.0L Engine Swap Article Part 1

Peterson's 4Wheel & Offroad 6.0L Engine Swap Article Part 2

LQ9 6.0L Install Article

Gen III GM smallblock by Doug Anderson @ engine-builder.com

The Millennium Motor: Inside The LS1 by Hib Halverson

Ruthless Pursuit of Power: 2010 Edition - Our In-Depth Look the Camaro SS's LS3 by Hib Halverson

GM's LS2 V8 - article at Autospeed.com

Technical Article: The Millennium Motor: Inside C5’s, LS1 Engine by Hib Halverson

Project Light Speed Part 3 - 49hp LS1 Engine Cam Swap - Tech Article @ CarCraft.com by Jeff Smith

Ruthless Pursuit of Power: GM Brings us to the next Gen III: LS6 by Hib Halverson

Ruthless Pursuit of Power: The Sequel 2002 LS6 by Hib Halverson

Corvette LS3 Engine - Worthy Successor - Article in Vette Magazine by Christopher R. Phillip

Other:

GM Performance Parts Catalogue 2008

GM Performance Parts Cattalo 2009

GM's LS1 Engine Kit Installation Guide

 

Sources:

Turn Key Engine Supply
2620 Temple Heights Dr.
Oceanside CA 92056
Phone: 760-941-2741
Fax: 760-941-2713
http://www.turnkeyenginesupply.com/
sales@turnkeyenginesupply.com

 

 


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